September 2009

Regulating Coal Ash as a Hazardous Waste Could Reduce the Stimulus Impact of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act

Ranking members of the Oversight and Government Reform and Transportation and Infrastructure Committees, are writing the Department of Transportation, to draw their attention to the negative effects of EPA's proposed decision to regulate coal ash as a hazardous waste.  Members of congress are concerned that designating coal ash, a CCB frequently used in highway construction, as a hazardous waste could reduce the stimulus impact of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act.

Please read the full letter to the Department of Transportation below.

 

Letter from United States Senators to the EPA opposing a hazardous waste designation

We understand that EPA is evaluating its regulatory options for the management of coal combustion byproducts (CCBs) and plans to propose federal management standards for CCBs by the end of the year. This issue involves an important component of the nation's overall energy policy as EPA's decision could affect electricity costs from coal-fired plants, the continued viability of CCB beneficial use practices (which plays a significant role in the reduction of greenhouse gases), and the ability of certain power plants to remain in service.

Letter from United States Senator Pat Roberts to the EPA Opposing a Hazardous Waste Designation

I understand that you will soon make a decision how to best regulate coal combustion byproducts (CCBs). This decision will have major consequences for the nation's electric power sector, transportation infrastructure, hazardous waste management capabilities, and the Obama Administration's stated goal of reducing greenhouse gas emissions.
 

Letter from United States Representatives to EPA Administrator Lisa Jackson Opposing a Hazardous Waste Designation

We understand that EPA is evaluating its regulatory options for the management of coal combustion byproducts (CCBs) and plans to propose federal management standards for CCBs by the end of the year. This issue involves an important component of the nation's overall energy policy as EPA's decision could affect electricity costs from coal-fired plants, the continued viability of CCB beneficial use practices (which plays a significant role in the reduction of greenhouse gases), and the ability of certain power plants to remain in service.

Root Cause Analysis for TVA Ash Spill

TVA contracted with AECOM, one of the nation’s leading geo-technical engineering firms, in January to perform a very detailed root cause analysis to determine the cause of the ash spill at the Kingston Fossil Plant.  The findings and analysis were part of a comprehensive six-month report made public today by AECOM.