April 2010

From Waste to Efficiency

(Business Lexington 4-20-2010) For decades, fly ash, one of the residues generated in the burning of coal, especially at coal-fired power plants, was released into Kentucky's skies. Today, by law, fly ash is captured in the chimneys of those plants. Some of the companies in Kentucky that collect that fly ash include Kentucky Utilities, Louisville Gas and Electric, Cincinnati Gas and Electric and Kentucky Power. 
 

No Current Risk from Golf Course Fly Ash EPA Says

(Virginia Pilot 4-23-10) After an investigation that stretched for nearly two years, a contractor for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has concluded that contaminants found in the water under a Chesapeake golf course sculpted from fly ash pose no public health threat.
 
The conclusion effectively ends the federal agency's involvement and means the Battlefield Golf Club at Centerville will not land on a list of the nation's most contaminated properties.
 

Fly Ash Looms as the "New Asbestos"

(Engineering News Record 4-7-2010) Concrete groups are on tenterhooks, waiting for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to publish a proposed rule that aims to designate fly ash and other coal-combustion by-products as hazardous waste. The concrete sector is concerned even about the ramifications of a “hybrid” rule that would allow beneficial uses of CCBs to continue.Major among these beneficial uses is fly ash in concrete. The ingredient, a partial replacement for portland cement, is known to increase concrete’s constructibility, durability and sustainability.

New Tunnel Lowers Emissions in Concrete

(Oslo, Norway - 4-1-2010) -- The cement used in Oslo’s new Bjørvika tunnel kept 8,000 tonnes of CO2 from entering the environment – the equivalent of 60 million vehicle trips through the tunnel. The more environment-friendly concrete is the result of intensive research collaboration. The Norwegian concrete industry won worldwide acclaim for its gigantic North Sea constructions. Its best-known achievement was the Troll A platform in 1995 – the largest structure ever moved by man.