Concrete Moves for Carbon Reduction

(The Construction Index 04-12-2013) Ash produced at coal-fired power stations is helping to improve the sustainability of concrete. Dr Robert Carroll from the UK Quality Ash Association explains how. Concrete is one of the most important construction materials there is. The worldwide use of concrete today is more than double that of wood, plastic, steel and aluminium combined. But it is one of the most carbon intensive industries on the planet and it is under increasing pressure to change the way it operates.

Subcommittee Discusses Draft Coal Ash Legislation in Effort to Preserve Jobs

 (Energy Commerce 04-11-2013) WASHINGTON, DC – The Subcommittee on Environment and the Economy, chaired by Rep. John Shimkus (R-IL), today held a hearing on the discussion draft of H.R. __, the Coal Ash Recycling and Oversight Act of 2013. Today’s hearing builds on the subcommittee’s work last Congress to set up a state-based regulatory program for the safe management, reuse, and disposal of coal residuals. The draft bill mirrors the text of S. 3512 in the 112th Congress, which was introduced in the Senate with strong bipartisan support, and is similar to Rep.

Green Groups and Industry Agree We Need to Solve Coal Ash Problem Now

(Roll Call 04-09-2013) In an April 1 Roll Call op-ed, “McCarthy’s Work at EPA Should Start With Backing Off Coal Ash,” Kirk Benson, the chairman and CEO of Headwaters Inc., America’s largest manager and marketer of building products made from coal fly ash, called out the Environmental Protection Agency for the needless and self-inflicted delay of its rule-making to establish national standards for the disposal of coal ash, the second-largest industrial waste stream in the nation. We could not agree more.

Nashik may get fly ash cluster project

(The Times of India 04-08-2013) NASHIK: A brick-manufacturing cluster project for small units engaged in making bricks from fly ash is likely to come up in Nashik soon. The District Industry Centre (DIC), Nashik, is planning to set up the cluster project by putting up a common facility centre for the units engaged in making bricks from fly ash, generated from the thermal power station at Eklahare near Nashik.

Experts propose research priorities for making concrete 'greener'

(Phys.Org 04-04-2013) The challenge of making concrete greener—reducing its sizable carbon footprint without compromising performance—is just like the world's most ubiquitous manufactured material—hard! But, according to a new report from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), the potential engineering performance, energy-efficiency and environmental benefits make it a challenge worth tackling.

Making Concrete Greener Is a Challenge Worth Tackling

(AZoBuild 04-04-2013) The challenge of making concrete greener—reducing its sizable carbon footprint without compromising performance—is just like the world's most ubiquitous manufactured material—hard!

McCarthy's Work at EPA Should Start With Backing Off Coal Ash

(Roll Call 04-01-2013 ) During Lisa P. Jackson’s Senate confirmation hearing in January 2009, the incoming EPA administrator pledged to create national standards for coal ash disposal by the end of that year. Now, more than four years later, the Environmental Protection Agency is mired in a seemingly endless process of its own making — a process that has produced no standards but has created plenty of regulatory uncertainty that is harming our environment daily.
 

Coal ash legislation forthcoming

 (Lexology 02-10-2013) Representative David McKinley (R-WV) is expected soon to introduce coal ash legislation. The measure will attempt to strike a balance between Representative Bill Johnson’s (R-OH) Stop the War on Coal Act (H.R. 3409) and Senator John Hoeven’s (R-ND) Coal Ash Recycling and Oversight Act of 2012 (S. 3512); both would have prohibited the Environmental Protection Agency from regulating ash from coal-fired power plants, leaving oversight to state permitting programs.

CRS to Redraft Report Critical of Coal Ash Legislation

(POWERnews 02-07-2013) Criticism from Sen. John Hoeven (R-N.D.) and Rep. David McKinley (R-W.V.) has reportedly prompted the Congressional Research Service (CRS) to revise a December 2012 report in which it found coal ash bills sponsored by the lawmakers would not guarantee the protection of human health and the environment.